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INSTRUCTIONS
NOTES

Make Your Own Molds

- For making your own molds -

 
 
 
 


Make your own molds for use with chocolate butter, rolled fondant, 
gum paste, cream cheese candies, and much more. Sometimes you just can't 
find the molds you want, now you can make your own.

SUGARCRAFT'S HOME-MENU
LIST OF ALL GUMPASTE/FONDANT CUTTERS - TOOLS


Silicone Putty
F.D.A. APPROVED
Now your food products will be 100% edible!
Not to be confused with "food grade" as with other plastique brands.
This brand is far superior to the old Silicone brand we use to carry.
A Sugarcraft exclusive! Formulated especially for us.
You will find this formula to be more flexible and easier to remove from molds.
To make a mold all you do is pull out equal parts of silicone putty molding compounds, knead them together, press them onto the item you want to mold, let it set up, and you have a custom mold. Use any item around the house. Even use cloth lace to make molds for your fondant cakes!
Our F.D.A. approved
1 lb. Silicone Putty
8 oz. base & 8 oz. catalyst
#1/2a-1/2b  $32.59 
2 lb. Silicone Putty
1 lb. base & 1 lb. catalyst
#1A-1B  $63.99
6 lb. Silicone Putty
3 lb. base & 3 lb. catalyst
#3A-3B $180.95

DETAILS: Silicone Putty is not a liquid, but instead has the consistency of dough. It can be applied by hand to almost any surface or rolled out between two sheets of wax paper. Cure time is only one hour to yield a pliable, yet durable, rubber mold that is suitable for direct food contact. Silicone Putty resists temperatures below freezing and up to 400 degrees F. Because you apply only the amount you need, you save on quantity of silicone used compared to liquid silicones. "Very Cost Effective." Absolutely perfect for chocolate, butter, tallow, cheese, sugar, pastillage, hippen and ice molding.
You'll find so many things to make molds from: buttons, jewelry, leaves, lace, and sculptures.
You'll love how easy it is to do.
With experience you'll learn how to make a mold of almost any shape.
Withstands temps to 450°F.


HERE ARE SOME IDEAS FOR USE



ear plugs!
INFORMATION
Silicone Putty is made from the combination of a white base material and a pink catalyst material. Equal amounts, either by weight or volume, should be combined and mixed by hand until a uniform color is achieved. One the combination has been completes, you have approximately 20 minuets (at room temperature) to work with the silicone putty until it starts to cure and turn to rubber. Only combine enough material to be used in 20 minutes. You will be able to tell when this starts to occur by the change in texture and feel of the product, it actually starts to get stiff and is not as pliable. Cure time may be extended by refrigerating the base, catalyst or both before use. Cure time may be accelerated by gently elevating the temperature of the base, catalyst, or both
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See link for instructions above...To make a mold all you do is pull out equal parts of silicone putty molding compounds, knead them together, press them onto the item you want to mold, let it set up, and you have a custom mold. Use any item you wish to make into a candy mold, anything around the house. Even use cloth lace to make molds for your fondant cakes!
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Once you've made a mold, you can use it with chocolate, butter, ice, fondant, gum paste, marzipan, soap, candy, wax, butter, cream cheese candies, ice, edible cake decorations, tallow, marzipan, gumpaste, fondant, grade mange mixture, gelatin, plaster, polymer clay, casting resins and more. You can use it for hard candy or caramels. You can bake cookies or gingerbread in it. You'll find so many things to make molds from: buttons, jewelry, leaves, lace, and sculptures. You'll love how easy it is to do. With experience you'll learn how to make a mold of almost any shape.
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Push molds/chocolate molds: Spray the object to be molded with Pam, and wipe off with a paper towel to leave a thin film. Mix Silicone Putty, form a disc twice as thick as object and place on parchment paper. Push the object in, making sure it's well encased and making sure to eliminate bubbles. Let set. For larger pieces, place piece down on its back, then apply Silicone Putty a bit at a time, making sure to eliminate bubbles.
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Lace molds: Place lace piece in a bag, add glue. Squish around, remove piece to parchment paper or foam core. Blot excess glue, let dry. If on foam core, trim edges. Spray lace with Pam, blot to leave just a thin film. Mix Silicone Putty and form a disc twice as thick as lace piece. Press lace in evenly and let set. Remove lace. If making a two-sided mold (foam core only), spray the mold you've just made with Pam, blot with paper towel. Mix up more Silicone Putty and press into mold. Let set. Separate pieces. Use as any commercial two-sided lace mold.
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3-D molds: Examine object to determine how many parts are needed. Mask object with Sculpey. Spray with Pam, blot. Mix Silicone Putty and apply to piece, making sure to eliminate air bubbles. Let set. For second piece, use the cured Silicone Putty as one piece of mask, and mask next section with Sculpey. Spray, blot, mix, apply. Repeat for each additional piece, using cured pieces as masks where appropriate. To use mold, remove object, and reassemble mold, holding together with rubber bands.
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INSTRUCTIONS USING SILICONE PUTTY:
Step 1: Silicone Putty has the consistency of clay. Mix equal amounts of Part A (pink) and Part B (white) by scaled weight or volume.
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Step 2: Parts A and B are combined and kneaded until uniform color is achieved. Silicone Putty can be flattened by hand or rolled with a pin between sheets of wax paper.
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Step 3: A small amount of silicone is rubbed into detail of medallion. Medallion is pressed into Silicone Putty that has been rolled out twice the thickness of the medallion.
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Step 4: Silicone Putty has a limited work time and cure time. Silicone Putty should be allowed to fully cure before removing medallion.

Step 5: With a flex of the mold, remove medallion. Your new silicone mold is ready to use!

Yield: 1 lb. of Silicone Putty covers approximately a 7" x 7" x 1/2" thick area.
What people are saying about this new brand of silicone!
A great source for demoonstrations on this product is ICES convention held somewhere in the USA yearly in July.
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GOT THE NEW BETTER BRAND: Oh good, I bought the new brand. Will be placing another order soon, too many ideas that need molding. :-) I molded the acorn in two pieces - placing Pam along the rim of the nut so that the top portion (cap) wouldn't stick to the bottom mold. Worked like a charm. Another tip on lace. I heard that you have to glue the lace to something solid like foam core board then also place a little white school glue on the lace to stiffen it (and let dry thoroughly) but not so much glue as to block delicate designs. The foam core board provides a solid surface to impress with so your lace impression comes out flat - not like waves in the ocean from pressing the lace down with your fingertips. And on the backside of the mold you can put a little packing tape handle to help pull it out of the mold after it's set. I honestly don't think that (with this new molding compound) you'll have any problems getting anything to release from it. But if you're worried I'd squirt some Pam on your counter and spread it around then press the lace piece into the minute amount of Pam before pressing it into the molding compound.

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Comment I bought the large size Silicone Putty from Dolores and went nuts copying all sorts of things from a large acorn, to buttons, to large cross necklaces and next I'm doing pearls. LOVE this stuff and it's so simple. Just remove the amount of white putty from one jar and the same size amount of putty from the pinkish jar and mix together in your hands then either place on any counter top (won't stick to it) or inside a small box and insert the item you want copied. Let sit for a few hours and remove the item. Then fill the mold with chocolate or fondant or gumpaste. (blue)...The stuff I'd avoid is the reusable (and remeltable) stuff. It's simply horrid.
Q. I read the directions on here about molding with lace. I assume the glue is to stiffen the lace and the Pam is to get it to release from the Putty. Have you tried making a mold from lace?
A. From Kathy f:  You're right about the glue and the pam. Another tip - don't ever try to mold anything with latex or wear latex gloves while working with the silicone because the latex won't allow it to set....... ever...... no matter how long you wait for it to dry.
The pink and white combo Denise mentioned must be the new one because the old version was blue and white. The blue makes fairly firm molds that are flexible but rubbery. The pink and white molds are much softer and I bet they would work better for lace because they are more flexible.
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HINTS From DeniseNH:
To make sure the mold doesn't bend or distort, place the blob of clay on a cookie sheet or plate THEN impress with the product you want to mold, remove carefully. Fill with chocolate and pop into the freezer for the same amount of time your usual plastic molds take (10 min?) then it will shrink a tad like it does with a plastic mold and will pop right out of the clay. If you need more than one, then just rework and reimpress the product you want to mold and continue.
After you make your mold you want to let the Silicone Putty set up before you put the chocolate in .....otherwise you'll have a mess and the chocolate would taste like rubber. You want to wait for the Silicone Putty to set up before removing the molded item.
prices subject to change without notice.